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School of Bikaner Painting A Collector's Dream: Indian Art in the collections of Basant Kumar and Saraladevi Birla and the Birla Academy of Art and Culture, edited by Karl Khandalavala and Saryu Doshi,

Title:School of Bikaner Painting A Collector's Dream: Indian Art in the collections of Basant Kumar and Saraladevi Birla and the Birla Academy of Art and Culture, edited by Karl Khandalavala and Saryu Doshi,
Author:Doshi, Saryu
Publication:Marg
Enumeration:Vol. 38-3, p. 181-189
Abstract:This article is an overview of the Bikaner school of painting and gives details of the many rulers that served as patrons for these paintings. Although no miniatures can be attributed to the reign of Rai Singh, around the end of the 16th century, a set of the Bhagavata Purana can be assigned to the reign of Sur Singh, Rai Singh's younger son and successor. This series consists of charming miniatures painted in the Popular Mughal style -- an idiom which appears to have developed outside the imperial, atelier. In the reign of the next ruler, Karan Singh (1631-74), artists were employed to paint for the ruler. Towards the end of the 17th century, the artistic activities at the Bikaner court gathered momentum under the patronage of Karan Singh's son and successor Anup Singh (1674-98). The artists in the employ of Bikaner rulers belonged to Muslim families who must have migrated to Bikaner as a result of Aurangzeb's discouraging and disheartening policies towards artistic endeavours. The style practised at Bikaner in the reigns of Karan Singh and Anup Singh was under such pervasive influence of the Mughal style that it could be considered almost a provincial idiom of that style. An appendix lisiting names of some of the artists in the royal atelier in Bikaner is attached.

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