Kamat's Potpourri Kamat Research Database  
Kamat's PotpourriNew Contents
About the Kamats
Feedback
History of India
Women of India
Faces of India
Indian Mythologies
geographica indicaArts of India
Indian Music
Indian Culture
Indian Paintings
Dig Deep Browse by Tags
Site Map
Historical Timeline
Master Index
Research House of Pictures
Stamps of India
Picture Archive
Natives of India
Temples of India
Kamat Network
Blog Portal


(Keyword Search)

Research Abstracts: Ajanta

Title:The Caves at Ajanta
Author:Spink, Walter M.
Publication:Archaeology
Enumeration:vol. 45 (November/December 1992) p. 52-60
Abstract:In 1819, British lieutenant John Smith chanced upon the ancient caves of Ajanta, which are located in a gorge in western India's Deccan plateau. The caves, which had lain forgotten for more than 1,300 years, housed an ancient Buddhist monastery that provides a unique record of Indian culture at the height of its Golden Age in the fifth century A.D.. The Ajanta caves were created by artisans who used little more than hammers, chisels, palettes, and brushes. Encouraged by the noble aspirations, wealth, and faith of their patrons, the artisans recorded the daily life of the times in paintings and sculptures that have been preserved in 30 rock-hewn chapels. The creations glorify Buddha and represent a celebration of the peaceful and prosperous times under the rule of Harisena. Sidebars discuss the fourth-century artistic renaissance at Ajanta, the similarities between the Ajanta halls and Athenian temples, and efforts to preserve the caves and their contents.

Source of Abstract: Provided by Publisher

Tools:

Title:Architectural Features (of Western Indian Cave Temples)
Author:(n/a)
Publication:Marg
Enumeration:Vol. 20 Issue no. 2, p. 11-23, March 1967
Abstract:The Caves at Ajanta (caves nos 6, 17, 2, and 21), Ghatotkacha, Jogeshwari, Elephanta (cave 1), Ellora (Dhumar Lena and Rameshvara), and Aurangabad (cave 7) are presented chronologically, according to the evolutionary trends in their architectural features.

Source of Abstract: Provided by Publisher

Tools:

Title:Seated Couples
Author:(n/a)
Publication:Marg
Enumeration:Vol. 20 Issue no. 2; March 1967, p. 62-67
Abstract:The seated figures of nagas and naginis (Ajanta caves), Uma-Maheshvara (Jogeshwari, Elephanta, and Ellora caves), Ravananugraha scenes depicting Ravana and Shiva-Parvati (Jogeshwari, Elephanta, and Ellora caves), and Hariti and Panchika (Ajanta, Aurangabad, and Ellora caves) are illustrated and described.

Source of Abstract: Provided by Publisher

Tools:

Title:Origin and Development of Embroidery in Our Land (India)
Author:Chattopadhyaya, Kamaladevi
Publication:Marg
Enumeration:Vol. 17 Issue no. 2; March 1964, p. 5-10
Abstract:Embroidery is undoubtedly of Oriental origin, and probably has existed since 3000 BC. India is said to be one of its original homes. Embroideries are mentioned in the vedas and the epics, and seen in Buddhist stupas and sculptures, Kushana sculptures, and Ajanta frescos. The art reflects the local tradition, and each region developed its distinctive styles: floral and natural motifs in Kashmir; phulkari ("flowering work") in the Punjab; the rumals on Chamba; kanbi in Kutch; the embroidery practised in Haryana villages and rural areas around Delhi; stitch embroideries on silk and cotton in Rajasthan; kasuti in Mysore; chikankari of northern India; kashida in Bihar; kantha embroidery and Dhaka stitch in Bengal; the embroidered borders of the cloth worn by women in Manipur; and Lamani and Banjara, the best known tribal embroidery work in India. Some embroidered items in India are kerchiefs, veils, scarves, and waist bands, and the typical products exclusively for Western use are church linen and neck-cloths. There are two categories of gold and silver embroideries: zardozi and kamdani. A closely allied form to embroidery is applique.

Source of Abstract: Provided by Publisher

Tools:

Title:Revaluation of Aurangabad Sculptures (Editorial)
Author:Ray, Amita
Publication:Marg
Enumeration:Vol. 16 Issue no. 3; June 1963, p. 2
Abstract:This special issue of Marg brings out the importance of the sculptures of the Aurangabad caves which have received scant attention, although some of them would even surpass the Buddhist sculptures at the more well-known nearby centres of Ajanta and Ellora.

Source of Abstract: Provided by Publisher

Tools:

Title:Medieval Period -- Antiquities of the Punjab Hill Districts of Chambae
Author:Goetz, Hermann
Publication:Marg
Enumeration:Vol. 10 Issue no. 2; March 1957, p. 15-18 [Preliminary by Marg]
Abstract:The preliminary by Marg introduces the article, which looks at the scanty evidence available for the transition from the ancient to the medieval period in the Punjab. The three temples of Brahmor, Chatrarhi, and Markula-Udaipur contain wooden reliefs and brass statues contemporary with the central Indian art of the Buddhist and Hindu cave temples of Ajanta and Ellora. The Brahmor and Chatrarhi temples represent later Gupta and Buddhist art, while the Markula-Udaipur temple carries the last remnants of the lost late Kashmir art, which was a source of the Tibetan tradition.

Source of Abstract: Provided by Publisher

Tools:

Title:India's Sculptured Temple Caves
Author:Wentzel, Volkmar
Publication:National Geographic Magazine
Enumeration:May 1953, pp. 665-678
Abstract:Photographic feature on the cave temples Ajanta and Ellora in Maharashtra. Magnificient sculptures that show the distinct art styles of Hindusim, Jainism, and Buddhism.

Source of Abstract: Written by Kamat Editorial Team

Tools:

Title:The Golden Age of Buddhist Art: Gupta Period -- Painting: Ajanta
Author:Goetz, Hermann
Publication:Marg
Enumeration:Vol. 9 Issue no. 2; March 1956, p. 86-92
Abstract:With colour plates and illustrations of Ajanta frescos, the article attempts to define their chronology, development, and position (in the context of contemporary Indian civilizations) across almost one millennium (early 2nd century BCE to as late as 6th-7th century CE). The dates suggested by Ghulam Yazdani are revised with respect to the individual frescos, including the Cave IX friezes of Nagaraja or Gautamiputra Sriyajña Satakarni, and animal and hunting scenes. The introduction of Gupta painting at Ajanta is attributed to the matrimonial alliance between Rudrasena II and Chandragupta II, and frescos of Cave XVII are said to mirror the spirit of Kalidasa's poetry. The Ajanta frescos reveal a progressive change in ethnic structure and cultural affiliations. It is surmised that Ajanta became a centre of Gupta art under Chalukya tutelage, or might have been the work of refugees from the North.

Source of Abstract: Provided by Publisher

Tools:

Title:Links between Early and Later Buddhist Art: Sanchi
Author:Kramrisch, Stella
Publication:Marg
Enumeration:Vol. 9 Issue no. 2; March 1956, p. 29-35
Abstract:Two opposing themes -- Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth and fortune, in the midst of blossoming lotuses, and the monument of death and total extinction, the stupa, thrice repeated, four trees of Sambodhi (Total Awakening) form the seven symbols of the Manushi Buddhas. These are represented on the top beam of the Southern Gateway (of the Great Stupa built in the 1st century CE). The carvings on the gateway were the work of different artisan groups. The guild of ivory carvers of Vidisa (Besnagar) contributed the reliefs depicting "worship of the hair-relic" -- "procession of Indra", and "cortege of the gods". The style of the "ivory carvers" is described, and compared with that of Ananda, the foreman of artisans of King Siri Satakarni. Ananda's work on the south gateway is in close proximity with that of the " ivory carvers". The two styles not only continue the vision formulated in the previous century and well represented at Bharhut, but also show the emergence of a new style in sculpture. The style of the "ivory carvers" continued for more than four centuries through the phases of paintings at Ajanta, during which Buddhist thought evolved in its entirety.

Source of Abstract: Provided by Author(s)

Tools:

Title:In Praise of Later Buddhist Art (Editorial)
Author:Anand, Mulk Raj
Publication:Marg
Enumeration:Vol. 9 Issue no. 2; March 1956, p. 2-6
Abstract:Demarcates the various historical phases of Buddhist art in India: (1) The ancient schools, mainly of the Maurya, Sunga, and Satavahana periods; (2) The Gandhara school (end of the 1st century to end of the 5th century CE), with a mixed indigenous and Greco-Roman tradition, which introduced the anthropomorphic Buddha and themes from his worldly life; (3) The Mathura school under Kushan patronage, which portrayed the indigenous sensibility and inner rhythm in the depiction of the human figure, yakshas and yakshis, and Bacchanalian bas-reliefs; (4) The extensions of the Gandhara style in Afghanistan (the Khyber Pass, Begram, Hadda, and Khotan); (5) The Satavahana tradition which continued between 25 BCE and 320 CE in the stupas of Amaravati, Ghantasala, Nagarjunakonda, Goli, Gummadidirum, and elsewhere; (6) The Gupta and post-Gupta periods (320-c. 700 CE), when free-standing chaityas and the paintings of Ajanta, Bagh, Badami, and Sittanvasal were executed; (7) The survival of Buddhism in eastern India between the 7th and 12th centuries under the Pala-Sena dynasties of Bengal, and the emergence of the Tantric interpretations of Buddhism; (8) The spread of Buddhism to Nepal and Tibet. In order to understand the nature of the Buddha image, it is important to contemplate upon the images produced under Buddhist patronage, but with their antecedents in the pre-Buddha Indian tradition. Buddhist art developed through a five century period of symbolic (geometric, theriomorphic, vegetable) depiction of the Buddha, similar to the aniconic phase of the pre-historic and vedic periods.

Source of Abstract: (n/a)

Tools:

See Also:

Kamat Reference Database

Kamat's Potpourri Research Database Abstracts

.

© 1995-2013 Kamat's Potpourri All Rights Reserved. Do not reproduce without prior permission. Some disclaimers apply