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Research Abstracts: Education

Title:Social History: Live History Presidential Address in the Karnataka Itihasa Academy conference held at Udupi
Author:Jyotsna Kamat
Publication:Itiasa Darshana / Karnataka Itihasa Academy, Bangalore
Enumeration:Vol 17, 2002
Abstract:As a historian she has tired to bring to the fore the day today life of the ancient and medieval people of Karnataka. She calls it as a live history in which she delves deep in the social aspect of ancient and medieval period of history to understand people’s food habits, dress, ornaments, education, entertainment, sports etc. Her source materials are Sanskrit and Kannada literature corroborated by the paintings and carvings on stone as well as wooden sculptures in the temples and hero stones. She insists that social history could be made into a purposeful living history to understand about our ancestors and their achievements. Just like how the scientists use living fossils for their study the social scientists can make use of our living traditions for the further study of human beings insists the author.

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Title:Emancipation of Untouchability and Vithalram Shinde (1872-1944 )
Author:B. Leela
Publication:Itiasa Darshana / Karnataka Itihasa Academy, Bangalore
Enumeration:Vol 17, 2002
Abstract:Born in Jamakhandi (now in Karnataka) Vithalram Shinde established Depressed Class Mission Society in 1906 with the help of members of Prarthana Samaj, Bombay and Justice Chandavarkar. The main purpose behind this organization was to provide education, job, health and social awareness to the depressed classes. Training in professional courses was given such as tailoring, carpentry; basket weaving etc. Many branches were opened up all over India which ran 25 schools with1018 students providing lodging and boarding. In Karnataka all important cities had branches which ran day as well as night schools for labour classes and others and were almost successful in bringing awareness among people against drinking. The article provides insight into the activities of Shinde and his organization in greater detail.

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Title:Poverty among Tribals in South West Madhya Pradesh: has anything changed over time?
Authors:Amita Shah and D. C. Sah
Publication:Journal of Human Development / Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group
Enumeration:Vol. 5, No. 2 pp. 249 - 263 , July 2004
Abstract:While there is evidence of some positive change as a result of economic development and some of the anti-poverty strategies implemented in India, the overall effect is fairly limited, especially among the poor. Some of the less favoured rural areas have faced deterioration due to a shrinking land base and restricted access to forest resources. The slow pace of economic growth only partly explains the exclusion of certain categories of households, indicating that parts of the rural community, particularly the landless and the small-marginal farmers, remain unaffected by even a moderately faster growth rate. This paper examines changes in poverty and related poverty factors in South West Madhya Pradesh, and it aims to further an understanding of poverty typology and poverty dynamics by focusing on a micro setting. Findings indicate that there is a need for establishing basic infrastructures, especially for health and education, and that crop- productivity and market support do not develop at a sufficient rate to impact on the reduction of chronic poverty.

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Title:The Changing Face of India. Part I: Bridging the Digital Divide
Authors:Nikam K., Ganesh A.C., and Tamizhchelvan M.
Publication:Library Review / Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.
Enumeration:vol. 53, no. 4, pp. 213-219, Apr. 2004
Abstract:"India lives in villages" said the Father of the Nation, Mahatma Gandhi. With 1,000 million people and 180 million households, India is one of the biggest growing economies in the world. With the advent of the Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) revolution, India and its villages are slowly but steadily getting connected to the cities of the nation and the world beyond. Owing to the late Rajiv Gandhi, India is now a powerful knowledge economy, and though India may have been slow to start, it certainly has caught up with the West and is ahead in important respects. The Government, the corporate sector, NGOs and educational institutions have supported rural development by encouraging digital libraries, e-business, e-learning and e-governance. The aim of this paper is to touch upon and highlight some of the areas where, by using ICT, the masses have been reached in this way. A follow-up paper will outline collections of significant cultural material which, once national IT strategies are fully achieved, could form part of a digitally preserved national heritage collection.

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Title:Water out of fire: novel women, national fictions and the legacy of Nehruvian developmentalism in India
Author:Ghosh Devleena
Publication:Third World Quarterly / Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group)
Enumeration:Vol. 22, No. 6 pp.:951 - 967 /December 1, 2001
Abstract:In the post-independence period in India popular fictions present a paradox: they represent the corruption of the era as well as the desirability of its modernity. In the work of overwhelmingly successful writers such as Shankar, the path of Nehruvian development is a double sign. It represents the corruption of the 'licenced raj' as well as the desirable lifestyle and possessions of the educated elite. The more the nation modernises, the more corrupt and desirable it becomes. All the noble social goals of the Nehru era - education, women's emancipation, progress - become transactional: things to be exchanged for wealth, Western technology and status. There is no room for integrity here; integrity is possible either in the past or in the West. These fictions tell the story of the 'deferral' of Western modernity in the imaginary of the postcolonial nation. Women, in these fictions, are especially ambiguous; though modernised and educated, they also retain their traditional roles and conventional gender relationships are valorised. This flawed representation of the modern nation also embodies its tragedy. This article concludes that the failure of the post-independence Nehruvian development project and its noble social goals has created a space that allows economic liberalisation and religious fundamentalism to flourish.

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Title:Imported or Indigenous? A comparative study of three open and distance education models in mainland China, India and Hong Kong
Authors:Zhang W-Y. and Shin N.
Publication:Open Learning / Carfax Publishing
Enumeration:vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 167-176, June 2002
Abstract:Drawing upon survey data and relevant literature, this paper compares the Radio and Television University System (RTVUS) in China, Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU), and the Open University of Hong Kong (OUHK) in respect of academic courses offered, course delivery mode, student characteristics, funding, and staffing. Similarities and differences are discussed, and the impact of socio-cultural factors in shaping distance education systems in different societies is examined.

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Title:Return Migrants And International Transfer Of Technology: A Case Study Of Azad, Jammu And Kashmir
Authors:Chaudhary Aslam M. and Hamdani Nisar H. S.
Publication:Journal Of Economic Integration / Sejong University
Enumeration:Vol. 17, No. 2 / June 2002 pp.: 339 - 362
Abstract:The study aims at exploring contributions of return migrants, particularly, their role in international transfer of technology in Azad, Jammu and Kashmir (AJK). Besides, reasons for migration and impact on employment generation, as well as, characteristics of migrants (s) are identified who are most likely to promote the transfer of technology. For this purpose, a field survey was conducted in Azad, Jammu and Kashmir, an area with a high rate of international migration. Econometric models were estimated to draw empirical support for determining of the issues. The empirical evidences indicate that education level, demographic profile, career planning before migration, vocational training,, duration of stay abroad and specific type of employer are some of the important determinants of migrants who are likely to transfer technology. The return migrants who spend on luxuries are less likely to contribute in this respect. Such migrants possess specific set of characteristics (s). As per our knowledge, this source of international transfer of technology has not been identified so far. Besides, different technologies like improvement in infoware, humanware, technoware and organisational skills etc., which contribute to improve human capital are identified. The study also provides information on re-employment pattern of return migrants. It further highlights impacts of return migrants on the promotion of local businesses and employment generation. Based upon the evidences, the study provides policy guideline to fully benefit from migrants. A labour policy to provide information about the types of feasible businesses, incentives to bring new technology and facilitation of setting up business could enhance local development. The study contributes by identifying an important new source of international transfer of technology (s) through migrants. The policy direction are provided to explored this new channel to transfer new technologies and, therefore, accelerate economic deve

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Title:On the Qualities of a Teacher and a Student: An Eastern Perspective Based on Buddhism, Vedanta And Sufism
Author:Mehrdad Massoudi
Publication:Intercultural Education / Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group
Enumeration:Vol. 13, No. 2, pp. 137 - 155 , June 2002
Abstract:This essay looks at the requirements and qualities of a student and a teacher as seen from Eastern traditions such as Vedanta, Zen Buddhism and Sufism. The objective is to show or to propose that the same qualities are also needed in our present-day education system, no matter what the subject of study is. Though the emphasis is on these three particular systems, it is understood that one can find the same or similar qualities in other spiritual traditions. At the end of the essay, a heat transfer model is developed whereby the different aspects of an "ideal" teacher, sometimes also referred to as the real teacher, or the true teacher, can be obtained from such a model.

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Title:Water out of fire: novel women, national fictions and the legacy of Nehruvian developmentalism in India
Author:Ghosh D.
Publication:Third World Quarterly - Journal of Emerging Areas / Carfac Publishing
Enumeration:vol. 22, no. 6, pp. 951-967,Dec. 2001
Abstract:In the post-independence period in India popular fictions present a paradox: they represent the corruption of the era as well as the desirability of its modernity. In the work of overwhelmingly successful writers such as Shankar, the path of Nehruvian development is a double sign. It represents the corruption of the 'licenced raj' as well as the desirable lifestyle and possessions of the educated elite. The more the nation modernises, the more corrupt and desirable it becomes. All the noble social goals of the Nehru era - education, women's emancipation, progress - become transactional: things to be exchanged for wealth, Western technology and status. There is no room for integrity here; integrity is possible either in the past or in the West. These fictions tell the story of the 'deferral' of Western modernity in the imaginary of the postcolonial nation. Women, in these fictions, are especially ambiguous; though modernised and educated, they also retain their traditional roles and conventional gender relationships are valorised. This flawed representation of the modern nation also embodies its tragedy. This article concludes that the failure of the post-independence Nehruvian development project and its noble social goals has created a space that allows economic liberalisation and religious fundamentalism to flourish.

Source of Abstract: Provided by Publisher

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Title:Moral Leadership in Education: an Indian Perspective
Authors:Sapre P. M. and Ranade I. D.
Publication:International Journal of Leadership in Education / Taylor and Francis Ltd
Enumeration:October 2001, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 367-381
Abstract:This paper examines the infusion of management concepts in Indian education and the subsequent and logical shift in emphasis from management to leadership, and considers the reasons for the current interest in leadership. The validity of some of the assumptions implicit in Western literature on management is examined. While reviewing Western literature that considers leadership theories and styles, an examination is made of the indispensable inner moral qualities that make leaders outstanding. Problems and dilemmas inherent in moral leadership are discussed. The concept of moral leadership is clarified using Indian scriptures. India has had examples of visionary leadership in the past that skilfully blended Indian thought with Western ideas to develop an indigenous and progressive system of education. From an overview of the lives and work of three illustrious Indian leaders—Vivekananda, Tagore and Gandhi—the essence of moral leadership is suggested. The present situation in India is characterized by a near absence of exceptional value-based leadership, not only in the field of education but also in practically all walks of life. A way of recapturing a vision of moral leadership is suggested.

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