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Research Abstracts on Partition of India

Page Last Updated: October 31, 2016

Here's a collection abstracts of research papers on the topic of Partition of India in 1947 and its impact on Indian subcontinent.

Title:Partitioning of Trace Metals Between Dissolved And Particulate Phases In A Typical Backwater System Of Kerala, India
Authors:P. Unnikrishnan and S. M. Nair
Publication:International Journal of Environmental Studies / Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group
Enumeration:Vol. 61, No. 6 pp. 659 - 676 /December 2004
Abstract:Concentrations of dissolved and particulate trace metals (Ni, Pb, Zn and Mn) and their partitioning behaviour between the dissolved and particulate phases in a typical backwater system of Kerala, viz. the southern upstream part of Cochin Estuarine System (South India), have been studied. Spatial and temporal variations of trace metals in the dissolved and particulate phases have been discussed with special reference to pH, dissolved oxygen, salinity and suspended particulate matter. The distribution and partitioning behaviour of trace metals in the water column were found influenced by the presence of a salinity barrier across the backwater system and also by the massive use of pesticides and chemical fertilizers in the vast area of agricultural land near the backwater system. Lack of proper flushing of the backwaters, which receive large amount of trace metals through the application of pesticides and agro-chemicals, due to the presence of the salinity barrier has significantly affected the water quality of the area. Keywords: Trace metals, Dissolved and particulate phases, Partitioning, Backwaters, Estuaries, Kuttanad

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Title:Voices Of Difference
Author:Kathinka Sinha-Kerkhoff
Publication:Critical Asian Studies / Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group
Enumeration:Vol. 36, No. 1 pp. 113 - 142 , March 2004
Abstract:This article deals with two sets of memories of the Partition of British India in 1947. The first is defined as "Partition memory"; the second set consists of the memories of Muslims who reside today in the state of Jharkhand, India. The author shows that the "enactment" of Partition memory -- at different times, in different places and ways, and with different intentions -- reinforces the original division of British India into two separate nations, along religious lines, and divides people into binary-opposed but internally homogenous communities of "Hindu locals" and "Muslim foreigners." Drawing on interviews conducted in Jharkhand in 2000-2001, the author shows that local Muslims experienced the events of 1947 very differently from what Partition memory would suggest. Their memories, which are rarely included in the official history of Partition, challenge the dominant history by underscoring multiple identities based on region rather than on religion. The author concludes by emphasizing that memories similar to those presented in this article should be included in the official Partition history for two reasons: they challenge the threat that a one-sided presentation of Partition memory poses and they will enrich and possibly even transform official Partition history.

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Title:Kashmiri Displacement and the Impact on Kashmiriyat
Authors:Patricia Ellis and Zafar Khan
Publication:Contemporary South Asia / Routledge
Enumeration:Vol. 12, No. 4 , pp.523 - 538 / December 2003
Abstract:Since 1947, the continuing dispute over Kashmir has seen large-scale permanent as well as temporary displacements of sections of the Kashmiri population. The majority of those affected by these events have been Muslims who have sought sanctuary in Azad Kashmir and, subsequently, in Pakistan. These waves of forced migration and the associated hard ships, however, have not appeared in international or regional refugee statistics. This paper details the displacement events and statistics, and explores refugee discourse to locate the reasons behind the non-appearance of these refugees on regional and international agendas. The authors then focus on the ways in which the presence of the Kashmiri refugees, particularly in Azad Kashmir, has contributed to the development of a Kashmiri conscious ness, or Kashmiriyat, within Kashmiri communities in Azad Kashmir and the Kashmiri diaspora. The work presented here is based on documentary analysis, discussions with Kashmiris living in the diaspora, and observations from earlier fieldwork carried out in Azad Kashmir and Pakistan on Kashmiri identity formation. Personal knowledge of political structures, events and activities within Azad Kashmir, and in the Kashmiri Diaspora located in Europe and America also has been drawn upon. The paper spans the period from Partition in 1947 until May 2003 when the Azad Kashmir prime minister proposed consideration of a permanent division of Kashmir with the Chenab Line formula.

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Title:The Radcliffe Boundary Commission and The Fate of Kashmir
Author:Shereen Ilahi
Publication:India Review / Routledge (Part of the Taylor & Francis)
Enumeration:Vol. 2, No. 1, pp.: 77 - 102 , January 2003
Abstract:Discussions about the Indo-Pakistani dispute over Kashmir often begin with the work of the boundary commission that partitioned Punjab as part of the August 1947 transfer of power from the British to the newly independent states of India and Pakistan. Pakistani officials have alleged that the boundary commission's decisions concerning Kashmir were part of a British and Indian conspiracy. Among other complaints, these officials claimed that Viceroy Lord Louis Mountbatten gerrymandered the partition line so that India would maintain land access to Kashmir and could thus ensure that Maharajah Hari Singh would accede to India. This article evaluates the validity of such allegations by examining what the mission of the boundary commission was, what it awarded to which new nation and why, and who made its decisions. The author concludes that claims of a British-Indian conspiracy to keep Kashmir in Indian hands are unsubstantiated and that the commission's partition of Punjab was not affected by the Kashmir dispute.

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Title:Constitutional Centring: Nation Formation and Consociational Federalism in India and Pakistan
Author:Adeney K.
Publication:Commonwealth and Comparative Politics / Frank Cass Publishers (T&F)
Enumeration:vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 8-33, Nov.2002
Abstract:This article examines, elucidates and explains the different processes through which India and Pakistan, products of the same colonial regime and institutional frameworks, attempted to create and 'centre' their 'nations'. Both regimes were concerned with state and nation building, and both were ethnically diverse. The Congress and the Muslim League participated in, and influenced the debates on, constitution formation before independence. In assessing the constitutional preferences before independence, especially the Cabinet Mission Plan, this article supports the revisionist account of partition. Jinnah's preference for centralised consociational accommodation was compatible with a united India, whereas Nehru's preference for a centralised majoritarian federation was not. This article questions Lijphart's argument that India should be understood as a confirming case for consociational theory. A central assumption is that decentring of a nation should not be understood in negative terms but has been a force for stabilisation.

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Title:Constitutional Centring: Nation Formation and Consociational Federalism in India and Pakistan
Author:Adeney Katharine
Publication:Commonwealth and Comparative Politics / Routledge(Imprint) of Taylor and Francis Group
Enumeration:Vol. 40, No. 3 pp. 8 - 33 /November 01, 2002
Abstract:This article examines, elucidates and explains the different processes through which India and Pakistan, products of the same colonial regime and institutional frameworks, attempted to create and 'centre' their 'nations'. Both regimes were concerned with state and nation building, and both were ethnically diverse. The Congress and the Muslim League participated in, and influenced the debates on, constitution formation before independence. In assessing the constitutional preferences before independence, especially the Cabinet Mission Plan, this article supports the revisionist account of partition. Jinnah's preference for centralised consociational accommodation was compatible with a united India, whereas Nehru's preference for a centralised majoritarian federation was not. This article questions Lijphart's argument that India should be understood as a confirming case for consociational theory. A central assumption is that decentring of a nation should not be understood in negative terms but has been a force for stabilisation.

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Title:Subjectivities, Memories, Loss of Pigskin Bags, Silver Spittoons and the Partition of India
Author:Kabir A.J.
Publication:Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies / Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group
Enumeration:vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 245-264, July 2002
Abstract:The Partition of India was a traumatic event whose repercussions continue to impact on South Asian subjectivities in complex ways that scholarship on that event and its representations has recently begun to illuminate. This paper offers two methodological propositions, both broadly indebted to scholarship on the representation of the Holocaust, to those investigating narrative representations of Partition. First, it suggests that all investigations into the event of Partition should proceed from a radical awareness of subject position. Second, it argues that, in the absence of public rituals and spaces of mourning sanctioned by the nation-state, Partition narratives present alternative, albeit contested sites for such mourning. It then applies these propositions to Midnight's Children, Book One. While the symbols of the pigskin bag and the silver spittoon deployed therein enable us to trace the interrelations between minority subjectivities, collective memory, and cultural loss, the trope of fragmentation provides us with a formal index to the consequent fracturing of the narrative capacities of representation.

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Title:Process of Othering in the case of India and Pakistan
Author:Sanjay Chaturvedi
Publication:Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie / Blackwell Publishers
Enumeration:Volume 93 Issue 2 Page 149 - May 2002
Abstract:Integral to the geopolitics of place-making on the subcontinent, having acquired hegemonic categorical forms in the imperial mapping of 'India' as two opposed and self-contained communities of the 'Hindus' and the 'Muslims', authenticated by an 'unclean partition', the otherness in the case of India and Pakistan persists in its various avatars. The reflexivity in the process of othering is evident in the character as well as behaviour of nations, which not only define themselves in respect to each other, but also seek for some kind of purity for the self through the demonisation of the other. Otherness is further reinforced through hegemonic, homogenising, state-centric discourses on 'national identity' and 'national (in)security', and exclusivist geopolitical imaginations of various ethno-religious groups. The discourse of otherness meets practice not only in the Pakistani social studies curriculum but also at the least expected site of the Wagah border crossing between Pakistan and India. But it does raise a few difficult questions, which are worth probing by inter-disciplinary, comparative studies of partition of India.

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Title:Demographic Movements: The Threat To India's Economy And Security
Author:Prakash Singh
Publication:Low Intensity Conflict & Law Enforcement / Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group
Enumeration:Vol. 11, No. 1 pp. 94 - 115 /Spring, 2002
Abstract:Migrations have taken place from the beginning of history. There has been a general impression that the free movement of people contributes to economic growth. Europe's economic recovery after the Second World War was fuelled in large part by the labour of immigrants. The pendulum has, however, now swung to the other extreme. There is pressure on land, resources are getting scarce and employment opportunities are limited. As a consequence, there is anti-immigrant feeling in several countries. In 1947, when British India was partitioned, Hindus moved out in large numbers from what was carved out as East Pakistan. After the liberation of Bangladesh in 1971, Hindus and Muslims continued to cross over to India for a variety of reasons. It is estimated that about 16 million Bangladeshis have managed to infiltrate into India. The presence of such a large body of immigrants is a strain on India's economy. What is worse, with the rise of Islamic fundamentalism in Bangladesh, the immigrants are also being looked upon as a security threat.

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Title:The 1947 Partition of India: A Paradigm For Pathological Politics in India And Pakistan
Author:Ishtiaq Ahmed
Publication:Asian Ethnicity / Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group
Enumeration:Vol. 3, No. 1 pp. 9 - 28 /March 2002
Abstract:This article seeks to shed light on the role a particular historical event can play in conferring legitimacy to the politics of communal and national animosities and hostilities. The Partition of India in 1947 was, on the one hand, a gory consummation of a long process of mutual demonising and dehumanising by Hindu and Muslim extremists. On the other, in the post-independence era, it became a model of violent conflict resolution invoked and emulated by ethnic and religious extremists and the hawkish establishments of India and Pakistan. The paper argues that the Partition of India epitomises the politics of identity in its most negative form: when trust and understanding have been undermined and instead fear and insecurity reign supreme, generating angst at various levels of state and society. In the process, a pathological socio-political system comes into being. I try to show how such a system functions within the domestic sphere as well as in India-Pakistan political interaction.

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