Bestiality in Indian Art

All Photographs by K.L. Kamat
Text by Vikas Kamat

First Online: February 14, 2004
Last updated : December 31, 2014

Students of Indian erotic art who are often told about the spiritual connections of sexuality are perplexed by images of humans having sexual contact with pet animals and birds. Researchers believe that depiction of bestiality in art is but a natural extension of the form -- both as reflection of realities of life and as artists' interpretation of myths and legends.

Indian mythology is full of instances where humans and animal forms have been integrated as if to indicate the parentage. Rishyashringa for instance, is said to have born to a deer by a hermit. The most famous of  this mixed species depiction is the avatar of  Lord Vishnu as Narasimha (half man, half lion).

Sex with animals is sometimes shown by period artists to depict immorality (as in "destruction of the school by invading foreigners is as sinful as copulating with a dog") or punishment ("thieves who rob the temple will be offered to a sex starved bull"; see bestiality as punishment)

Following is a collection of pictures where the artists have depicted bestiality. 

 

© K. L. Kamat
Woman having a Sexual Contact with her Dog
Woman having a Sexual Contact with her Dog
"Best friend as Lover" -- detail from a wall mural, Tumkur

© K. L. Kamat
A Beast Mounts a Woman
A Beast Mounts a Woman
Ancient sculpture from Barsur depicting bestiality

© K. L. Kamat
A Woman Lets a Monkey Taste her Body Fluids
A Woman Lets a Monkey Taste her Body Fluids
Detail from a temple sculpture in Nad-Kalse

© K. L. Kamat
Ancient Bestiality
Ancient Bestiality
Coitus with a pig, sculpture from the village of [[Ballegavi]]

 

See Also:

 

Kamat's Potpourri Timeless Theater Arts Erotic Arts

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